• Herpes Zoster
  • People with Shingles
  • Shingles Not a fatal illness

Herpes

Herpes is a frightening word for many people, isn’t it? It conjures up images of untreatable sexual infection and a life of enforced celibacy or shameful confessions to potential partners that one is infected. There are many different kinds of Herpes, however. Herpes Zoster, whilst it does specifically target the genitals, is one such type and, although usually transmitted sexually it is still a very unpleasant thing to suffer from.

 So what precisely is Herpes Zoster?

Most people would more commonly recognize the condition as Shingles. Loosely speaking, Shingles is a secondary form of the – generally fairly harmless – childhood ailment Chickenpox. But whereas many children experience Chickenpox and are left with little to show for it other than the occasional pockmark, Shingles is an altogether different experience.

Shingles Symptons

People with Shingles can and usually experience intense pain at the site of the infection. This is commonly accompanied by fever and a general feeling of deep unwellness that may cause a person to keep to their bed for over a week. The physical and mental ramifications of Shingles are really to be underestimated as even if the infection can be brought under control and recovery effected, the virus may spring up again at unexpected times for the rest of the sufferer’s life. In this respect it is much different from genital herpes which, as the crass joke goes, is ‘forever.’ Neither are at all pleasant conditions and neither is something to wish one anyone.

 So, what should one if one contracts Shingles?

The unfortunate is that mostly the afflicted person will suffer. There will be pain and probably significant disruption to their day to day lives. Nonetheless, the condition can be managed by the administration of drugs, both oral and topical, which can help to combat some of the symptoms and bring some relief to the stricken patient.

Shingles is the easiest condition to diagnose because, before the virus becomes fully fledged and the characteristic rash starts to appear, the symptoms can be and often are very similar to those of other medical conditions such as influenza, general infection or even the common cold. Diagnosis can only reliably take place once the pustular rash has appeared and by this point the patient is likely to have taken to their bed and to be feeling extremely unwell.

Unfortunately, there is no real way of telling who is likely to be at most risk from Shingles

Some diseases are genetic; Shingles is thought to be. Having been exposed to Chickenpox as a child or to a child who is suffering from said illness is a possible factor but it is the only one. According to viagrastoresa.com one of the best methods of prevention in adults is for them to completely avoid any children who are suffering from Chickenpox – that is always very easy if the children are one’s own, however! And running a household when one is bed bound oneself and has sickly children to look after is something that should be wished upon anyone.

Because of the highly unpleasant nature of Shingles, an afflicted person should refrain from interacting with others even when they begin to feel a little better – a process which can take upwards of a month depending on the individual – in case they pass the virus on. Once again, this can be very difficult. People may suffer because they have to take a great deal of time off work or because they cannot go about their day to day business, including taking good care of their homes and families.

 

Shingles is not a fatal illness and, despite the risk of repeated bouts in a person who has once been affected, the prognosis after recovery is generally good. Some patients will, however, experience lingering problems which can include lethargy and fatigue and it can be very difficult to explain these things to potentially unsympathetic employers or indeed friends and family members. It is important for a sufferer, even when they have begun to recover somewhat, to take extremely good physical and mental care of themselves in order to prevent a very speedy relapse. A physician should be consulted at all times to on the patient’s ongoing health.

 

 

Nicholas Cook

Published by Nicholas Cook

Dr Cook is a physician from Australia with special interests in erectile dysfunction and male health.

Join the Conversation

8 Comments

  1. I have been having problems with Herpes Zoster for the past four years, It seems to flare up once or twice a year, and I haven’t been able to find a prevention for when times get bad. I can’t identify any triggers and am looking for answers.

  2. My daughter suffers from Herpes Zoster. She has sought help from her primary physician who has prescribed different treatments and has told her to avoid stress as much as possible. The doctor questions my daughter’s husband’s sexual habits and partners. This is very sad.

  3. My father suffered from Herpes Zoster, he said it was truly a ring of fire. He is a man that is stoic, tough, and hard to bring to emotion, but the pain was excruciating.

  4. Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a common viral infection of the nerves, which results in a painful rash of small blisters on a strip of skin anywhere on the body. Even after the rash is gone, the pain may continue for months. What causes herpes zoster? Herpes zoster is caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus. Key Points. Herpes zoster is caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (the cause of chickenpox) from its latent phase. A painful rash, usually crops of vesicles on an erythematous base, develops on one or more adjacent dermatomes. Key Points. Herpes zoster is caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (the cause of chickenpox) from its latent phase. A painful rash, usually crops of vesicles on an erythematous base, develops on one or more adjacent dermatomes. Shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster, is a viral disease characterized by a painful skin rash with blisters in a localized area. … Shingles is due to a reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in a person’s body.

  5. My most recent interaction with Herpes zoster came at the age of twenty-two years old. I had just gotten back from serving with my church at a missions trip in Bolivia. Once I got home though I noticed my temperature trending upward and sores developing on my back. It then quickly developed into a rash. I then visited my doctor a week later. He diagnosed the Herpes Zoster disease and prescribed my antibiotics. I wound up quickly dissipating.

  6. Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a common viral infection of the nerves, which results in a painful rash of small blisters on a strip of skin anywhere on the body. Even after the rash is gone, the pain may continue for months. What causes herpes zoster? Herpes zoster is caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus.Key Points. Herpes zoster is caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (the cause of chickenpox) from its latent phase. A painful rash, usually crops of vesicles on an erythematous base, develops on one or more adjacent dermatomes.

  7. Herpes Zoster has been a serious burden to me. I have it very bad and I’m ashamed. I feel like people look at me differently when they find out. It’s like they think I’m gross and they are worried about catching it. I wish very much to be cured from this.

  8. I’ve dealt with Herpes Zooster, or shingles, ever since High School. It impaired my ability to engage in physical intimacy and compounded my feelings of inadequacy with the pain involved in breakouts. I searched far and wide in an effort to find a permanent solution and was thrilled when my Doctor told me about…

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *